Hi.

Welcome to PhDology,  a new academic discipline all about PhD life. Grab a pencil and notebook and get ready to take notes. 

What's in a name?

What's in a name?

The first week of my last semester in school has been rough. On my way back to school, my car broke down, engine troubles (I just got a new transmission). I was on deadline and I HAD to get back to school. I was in despair, I couldn’t think, but here came my dear husband to the rescue. Andrew put his work aside and drove 3 hours to pick me and my son up from WV, drove 3 hours to drop my car back to NC, turned around and drove us 10 hours to IN, and then 10 hours back home. 26 hours in 3 days, it was a lot. 

.

.

.

When female scientists or phd students get married, academia seems to make a big fuss about wether they should take their husband’s last name. Although there are some strong opinions, there’s no right or wrong decision. It’s just very personal, in which one must consider the professional, branding, and identity implications of a name change. I didn’t need to deliberate. I knew immediately I was taking my husband’s last name. Yes, I did the work but just like you can’t start a car without a key, or have a house without a roof, I couldn’t get this degree without help from my husband. He edits my papers, listens to my presentations, frustrations, breakdowns, car and mental, and overall supports me mentally and financially so that going to class, conferences, doing schoolwork and getting this degree is even possible. It has made ALL the difference. I LOOVVED my last name (s/o #Harrisgang) so much so, my first publication will be in my maiden name ( I wanted to honor my momma and grandma) but Dr. Tanisha Watkins, my first name, his last name, two people becoming one, it’s symbolic. One way I can show academia, the world, that this #phdjourney has indeed been a team effort. #Watkinsclan 

Race in Grad School

Race in Grad School

Phifth and Phinal

Phifth and Phinal

0